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THE TRUTH SERIES (HEART HEALTH)

– Posted in: Diabetes, Trucker Spot, Truth Series
The TRUTH Series

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Ready to start your heart-healthy diet? Here are eight tips to get you started.

Although you might know that eating certain foods can increase your heart disease risk, it’s often tough to change your eating habits. Whether you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt, or you simply want to fine-tune your diet, here are eight heart-healthy diet tips. Once you know which foods to eat more of and which foods to limit, you’ll be on your way toward a heart-healthy diet.

1. Control your portion size

 How much you eat is just as important as what you eat. Overloading your plate, taking seconds and eating until you feel stuffed can lead to eating more calories than you should. Portions served in restaurants are often more than anyone needs.

Use a small plate or bowl to help control your portions. Eat larger portions of low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and smaller portions of high-calorie, high-sodium foods, such as refined, processed or fast foods. This strategy can shape up your diet as well as your heart and waistline.  Most (FAST FOOD) isn’t healthy for us regardless, and we all know it, but choose wisely in any case!

Keep track of the number of servings you eat. A serving size is a specific amount of food, defined by common measurements such as cups, ounces or pieces. For example, one serving of pasta is 1/2 cup, or about the size of a hockey puck. A serving of meat, fish or chicken is about 2 to 3 ounces, or about the size and thickness of a deck of cards. Judging serving size is a learned skill. You may need to use measuring cups and spoons or a scale until you’re comfortable with your judgment.

2. Eat more vegetables and fruits

 Vegetables and fruits are good sources of vitamins and minerals. Vegetables and fruits are also low in calories and rich in dietary fiber. Vegetables and fruits contain substances found in plants that may help prevent cardiovascular disease. Eating more fruits and vegetables may help you eat less high-fat foods, such as meat, cheese and snack foods. Watch how much fruit you eat though as much of it has natural sugar in it and you’ll need to make sure you’re not consuming an overload of sugar especially if you’re DIABETIC!

Featuring vegetables and fruits in your diet can be easy. Keep vegetables washed and cut in your refrigerator for quick snacks. Keep fruit in a bowl in your kitchen so that you’ll remember to eat it. Choose recipes that have vegetables or fruits as the main ingredients, such as vegetable stir-fry or fresh fruit mixed into salads.

Fruits and vegetables to choose Fruits and vegetables to limit
  • Fresh or frozen vegetables and fruits
  • Low-sodium canned vegetables
  • Canned fruit packed in juice or water
  • Coconut
  • Vegetables with creamy sauces
  • Fried or breaded vegetables
  • Canned fruit packed in heavy syrup
  • Frozen fruit with sugar added

3. Select whole grains

 Whole grains are good sources of fiber and other nutrients that play a role in regulating blood pressure and heart health. You can increase the amount of whole grains in a heart-healthy diet by making simple substitutions for refined grain products. Or be adventuresome and try a new whole grain, such as whole-grain farro, quinoa or barley.
 
Grain products to choose Grain products to limit or avoid
  • Whole-wheat flour
  • Whole-grain bread, preferably 100% whole-wheat bread or 100% whole-grain bread
  • High-fiber cereal with 5 g or more of fiber in a serving
  • Whole grains such as brown rice, barley, and buckwheat (kasha)
  • Whole-grain pasta
  • Oatmeal (steel cut or regular)
  • White, refined flour
  • White bread
  • Muffins
  • Frozen waffles
  • Cornbread
  • Doughnuts
  • Biscuits
  • Quick breads
  • Cakes
  • Pies
  • Egg noodles
  • Buttered popcorn
  • High-fat snack crackers

4. Limit unhealthy fats

 Limiting how much saturated and trans fats you eat is an important step to reduce your blood cholesterol and lower your risk of coronary artery disease. A high blood cholesterol level can lead to a buildup of plaques in your arteries, called atherosclerosis, which can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke.

The American Heart Association offers these guidelines for how much fat to include in a heart-healthy diet:

Type of fat Recommendation
Saturated fat Less than 7% of your total daily calories, or less than 14 g of saturated fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet
Trans fat Less than 1% of your total daily calories, or less than 2 g of trans fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet

The best way to reduce saturated and trans fats in your diet is to limit the number of solid fats — butter, margarine, and shortening — you add to food when cooking and serving. You can also reduce the amount of saturated fat in your diet by trimming fat off your meat or choosing lean meats with less than 10 percent fat.

You can also use low-fat substitutions when possible for a heart-healthy diet. For example, top your baked potato with low-sodium salsa or low-fat yogurt rather than butter, or use sliced whole fruit or low-sugar fruit spread on your toast instead of margarine.

You may also want to check the food labels of some cookies, crackers and chips. Many of these snacks — even those labeled “reduced fat” — may be made with oils containing trans fats. One clue that food has some trans fat in it is the phrase “partially hydrogenated” in the ingredient list.

When you do use fats, choose monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil or canola oil. Polyunsaturated fats, found in certain fish, avocados, nuts and seeds, also are good choices for a heart-healthy diet. When used in place of saturated fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats may help lower your total blood cholesterol. But moderation is essential. All types of fat are high in calories.

An easy way to add healthy fat (and fiber) to your diet is ground flaxseed. Flaxseeds are small brown seeds that are high in fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. Studies have found that flaxseeds may help lower cholesterol in some people. You can grind the seeds in a coffee grinder or food processor and stir a teaspoon of them into yogurt, applesauce or hot cereal.

Fats to choose Fats to limit
  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Vegetable and nut oils
  • Margarine, trans fat-free
  • Cholesterol-lowering margarine, such as Benecol, Promise Activ or Smart Balance
  • Nuts, seeds
  • Avocados
  • Butter
  • Lard
  • Bacon fat
  • Gravy
  • Cream sauce
  • Non-dairy creamers
  • Hydrogenated margarine and shortening
  • Cocoa butter, found in chocolate
  • Coconut, palm, cottonseed, and palm-kernel oils

5. Choose low-fat protein sources

 Lean meat, poultry and fish, low-fat dairy products, and eggs are some of your best sources of protein. But be careful to choose lower fat options, such as skim milk rather than whole milk and skinless chicken breasts rather than fried chicken patties.

Fish is another good alternative to high-fat meats. And certain types of fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower blood fats called triglycerides. You’ll find the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in coldwater fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and herring. Other sources are flaxseed, walnuts, soybeans and canola oil.

Legumes — beans, peas, and lentils — also are good sources of protein and contain less fat and no cholesterol, making them good substitutes for meat. Substituting plant protein for animal protein — for example, a soy or bean burger for a hamburger — will reduce your fat and cholesterol intake.

Proteins to choose Proteins to limit or avoid
  • Low-fat dairy products such as skim or low-fat (1%) milk, yogurt and cheese
  • Eggs
  • Fish, especially fatty, cold-water fish, such as salmon
  • Skinless poultry
  • Legumes
  • Soybeans and soy products, such as soy burgers and tofu
  • Lean ground meats
  • Full-fat milk and other dairy products
  • Organ meats, such as liver
  • Fatty and marbled meats
  • Spareribs
  • Hot dogs and sausages
  • Bacon
  • Fried

6. Reduce the sodium in your food

 Eating a lot of sodium can contribute to high blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Reducing sodium is an important part of a heart-healthy diet. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends:
  • Healthy adults have no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day (about a teaspoon of salt)
  • People age 51 or older, African-Americans, and people who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease have no more than 1,500 mg of sodium a day

Although reducing the amount of salt you add to food at the table or while cooking is a good first step, much of the salt you eat comes from canned or processed foods, such as soups and frozen dinners. Eating fresh foods and making your own soups and stews can reduce the amount of salt you eat.

If you like the convenience of canned soups and prepared meals, look for ones with reduced sodium. Be wary of foods that claim to be lower in sodium because they are seasoned with sea salt instead of regular table salt — sea salt has the same nutritional value as regular salt.

Another way to reduce the amount of salt you eat is to choose your condiments carefully. Many condiments are available in reduced-sodium versions, and salt substitutes can add flavor to your food with less sodium.

Low-salt items to choose High-salt items to avoid
  • Herbs and spices
  • Salt substitutes
  • Reduced-salt canned soups or prepared meals
  • Reduced-salt versions of condiments, such as reduced-salt soy sauce and reduced-salt ketchup
  • Table salt
  • Canned soups and prepared foods, such as frozen dinners
  • Tomato juice
  • Soy sauce

7. Plan ahead: Create daily menus

 You know what foods to feature in your heart-healthy diet and which ones to limit. Now it’s time to put your plans into action.

Create daily menus using the six strategies listed above. When selecting foods for each meal and snack, emphasize vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Choose lean protein sources and healthy fats, and limit salty foods. Watch your portion sizes and add variety to your menu choices.

For example, if you have grilled salmon one evening, try a black-bean burger the next night. This helps ensure that you’ll get all of the nutrients your body needs. Variety also makes your meals and snacks more interesting.

8. Allow yourself an occasional treat

 Allow yourself an indulgence every now and then. A candy bar or handful of potato chips won’t derail your heart-healthy diet. This doesn’t include DIABETICS. But don’t let it turn into an excuse for giving up on your healthy-eating plan. If overindulgence is the exception, rather than the rule, you’ll balance things out over the long term. What’s important is that you eat healthy foods most of the time.

Incorporate these eight tips into your life, and you’ll find that heart-healthy eating is both easy and enjoyable. With planning and a few simple substitutions, you can eat with your heart in mind.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor

Before you let your Doctor do whatever they want, asking a few questions never hurts.

  1. What are the odds this test or treatment will help me?
  2. What are the chances this test or treatment will harm me?
  3. What will happen if I do nothing?
  4. What are my alternatives?
  5. Is there a natural way to get the same result?

Heart-Health-and-Exercise

Remember that a good Doctor will want you to be involved in your health decisions.

Supplements:

Fiber and Sterols for Your Heart

Fiber. Found naturally in fruits, grains, vegetables, and legumes, fiber cuts down the amount of cholesterol your body soaks up from food. Try to get at least 25 to 30 grams of it every day. It’s best to get your daily dose from your diet, but supplements are another option. There’s enough evidence that blond psyllium husk — common in fiber supplements — can lower “bad” LDL cholesterol. It can also raise the “good” kind, HDL.

Sterols and stanols. Find these in foods like nuts and grains, or you can buy them as supplements. They reduce the amount of cholesterol that your body absorbs from food. They’re also added to many foods, such as some margarine, orange juice, and yogurts. Experts recommend 2 grams a day to help lower LDL cholesterol.

Other Supplements That May Offer Benefits

Coenzyme Q10 ( CoQ10 ). Your body naturally makes small amounts of this enzyme, also known as ubiquinone and ubiquinol. As a supplement, CoQ10 may help lower blood pressure, either on its own or along with medications. Other studies have found that adding it to heart failure drugs may help people feel better day to day.

CoQ10 pills are also popular as a treatment for the side effects of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins. Why? These meds can sometimes lower the amount of CoQ10 the body makes on its own. Some doctors suggest adding a CoQ10 supplement to make up for the loss, hoping it will relieve problems like muscle pain and weakness. But study results have been mixed.

Fish oil. Full of omega-3 fatty acids, it can slash levels of triglycerides — an unhealthy fat in your blood — by up to 30%. It may also improve blood pressure. But it’s not clear if non-prescription fish oil supplements lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. Your best bet may be to eat fish with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends that all adults eat at least two 3.5-ounce servings of fish a week.

Garlic. Not only does it make just about anything tastes delicious, but it could also lower cholesterol and slightly lower blood pressure. It may slow the buildup of plaque in your arteries, reducing your risk of blood clots. Research shows that both garlic in food and in supplements may help.

Green tea. Research shows that both the extract and the drink may lower LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, and raise HDL levels.

I choose food and supplements. I prefer convenience with getting the right things in my body. Here are some of what I take daily:

0038_Niteworks_OrangeMango_30Day_Canister_US

Overview

 Niteworks® is a dietary supplement formulated with L-arginine and L-citrulline that help the body create more life-supporting Nitric Oxide.* 
 

Details 

  • Developed with Nobel Laureate in Medicine Dr. Lou Ignarro†
  • L-arginine helps support oxygen and nutrient delivery to working muscles by helping to promote blood flow.*
  • Rich in antioxidant Vitamins C and E. Some scientific evidence suggests that consumption of antioxidant vitamins may reduce the risk of certain forms of cancer. However, FDA has determined that this evidence is limited and not conclusive.
  • Available in Lemon and Orange-Mango flavors
  • Powder form

 

Key Benefits 

  • Amino acids L-arginine and L-citrulline support Nitric Oxide production and blood flow for the healthy function of the heart, brain, and other organs.*
  • Nitric Oxide production supports healthy blood pressure levels already within a normal range and blood vessel elasticity.*
  • L-arginine and L-citrulline help keep blood vessels toned and flexible for healthy vascular function.*

1500_CoQ10Plus_US

Overview 

CoQ10 Plus is specially formulated with CoQ10 and Vitamin D that support heart health.* 
 

Details 

  • With age, the body’s natural production of CoQ10 decreases. Supplementation adds to the body’s natural production to provide energy to the heart cells.*
  • Exclusively endorsed by Dr. Lou Ignarro, Nobel Laureate in Medicine†
  • Softgel form
 

Key Benefits 

  • CoQ10 provides energy to heart cells and supports the heart muscle.*
  • Vitamin D supports heart health.*
  • Antioxidant activity of CoQ10 protects cells from damaging effects caused by oxidative stress.*

0032_MegaGarlicPlus_US

Overview

 
Mega Garlic Plus supports healthy circulation and heart health.* 
 

Details 

  • Exclusively endorsed by Dr. Lou Ignarro, Nobel Laureate in Medicine†
  • Maintaining a healthy heart is important to keeping a fit and active lifestyle.
  • Tablet form
 

Key Benefits 

  • Garlic supports healthy circulation, heart health and healthy triglyceride and cholesterol levels, already within a normal range.*
  • Vitamin C provides antioxidant support.*

0065_Herbalifeline_US

Overview 

Herbalifeline® is a specially formulated blend of highly refined marine lipids with high-quality omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which help to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system.* 
 

Details 

  • Exclusively endorsed by Dr. Lou Ignarro, Nobel Laureate in Medicine†
  • Formulated with essential oils of thyme, peppermint and clove for flavor
  • Up to 30% of your daily caloric intake should consist of healthy fats, including omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Softgel form
 

Key Benefits 

  • Omega-3 fatty acids help maintain healthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels already within a normal range.*
  • Taking DHA regularly also helps to support normal brain function and vision.*
  • Supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

0100_TriShield_New_US

Overview

 
This proprietary blend is formulated with omega-3 fatty acids from Neptune Krill Oil (NKO®†), which support cardiovascular health.* 
 

Details 

Krill are tiny shrimp-like crustaceans that play a critical role in the oceanic food chain. Krill are eaten by fish, whales and penguins and provide them with omega-3s.

1096_CoreComplexWithCoQ10_US

Overview 

Target four key aspects of heart health: cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine and oxidative stress.*

Details 

  • Exclusively endorsed by Dr. Lou Ignarro, Nobel Laureate in Medicine††
  • Each packet contains:
    • 2 brown softgels of plant sterols (only available in Core Complex) and B vitamins;
    • 1 nectarine-colored CoQ10 Plus softgel
    • 1 burgundy Tri-Shield® softgel with Neptune Krill Oil (NKO®†); and
    • 2 gold Herbalifeline® fish oil softgels with omega-3 fatty acids
 
Key Benefits 
  • Plant sterols help support healthy cholesterol levels already within a normal range. B vitamins help to maintain healthy homocysteine levels that are already within a normal range.*
  • Herbalifeline® is a specially formulated blend of highly refined marine lipids with high-quality omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which help to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system by maintaining cholesterol and triglyceride levels already within a normal range.*
  • Tri-Shield® is a proprietary blend formulated with omega-3 fatty acids from Neptune Krill Oil (NKO®†), which support cardiovascular health.*
  • CoQ10 Plus is specially formulated with Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin D. CoQ10 provides energy to heart cells and protects cells from the damaging effects of oxidative stress. This excellent source of Vitamin D provides additional heart health support.*

The Core Complex is for those on the go who find it hard to remember to take their tablets. It’s all in one the really convenient.

Like always, Now you know the truth. What you do with it is up to you. If you want to track yourself for free here’s the link: https://www.ichange.com/coach/JuniorPSampson

That’s it for this time, dear reader, I give you the facts and you make the informed choices. As I’ve said before, if you give your body what it needs it’ll do amazing things. You never know how bad you truly feel till you start feeling better. That’s a fact peeps. Remember to make this your best day ever everyone!

 

 

 

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